Attorney Donald Novick Representing Sons of Sculptor in Estate Dispute

The New York Post recently reported on a case that is being handled by Attorney Donald Novick—a case that involves a claim that a deceased sculptor’s widow is unfairly hoarding and mishandling the artists’ estate. The New York Estate litigation attorney is representing the sons of artist and international businessman Norman Mercer, who died in 2007, according to the New York Post article. The artist has had pieces of artwork that have been sold for as high of a value as $100,000 each.

In the lawsuit, the artist’s sons have been unable to inventory more than 60 of the deceased artist’s Lucite sculptures due to the fact that the artist’s widow would not let the sons enter East Hampton Village home that belonged to the couple. The widow is also being accused of wrongfully siphoning off money from a $176,000 estate payment to her personal account, and of allowing the home that the artist left behind to deteriorate due to neglect. The New York Post article cited court papers that noted that the sons are set to receive 60% of the estate after the death of their father’s widow.

“This is not what Norman Mercer wanted for his children,” Attorney Novick was quoted as saying in the article. “This is not what he intended.”

Attorney Novick is the founder of our law firm, Novick & Associates, PC. With 30 years of legal experience, Mr. Novick provides high-quality legal support in the areas of estate litigation, estate planning and probate matters. He is an aggressive litigator who fights to protect the financial and personal well-being of his clients. If you are dealing with a lawsuit that stems from a dispute over an estate or some other type of estate-related matter, do not hesitate to contact our firm for assistance!

Categories: Estate Litigation
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